HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL ENVIRO I & II, AND SOCIAL WORK WITH THE ELDERLY Social Science homework help

HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL ENVIRO I & II, AND SOCIAL WORK WITH THE ELDERLY Social Science homework help

Click here to Order a Custom answer to this Question from our writers. It’s fast and plagiarism-free.

SWK205- SOCIAL WORK WITH THE ELDERLY 

Lesson 3 Discussion

Please review the readings and consider the following in your discussion post:

· Please share your thoughts after reviewing the readings.

· What are some of the benefits and challenges for a Social Worker working with older adults and their families?

· Do these particular roles as a Social Worker working with older adults interest you and why?

· What do you think you need to understand about older adults to be successful in working with them?

This discussion post should be a minimum of 250 words or one page.

READING RESOURCES

The Geriatric Social Worker https://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/091514p34.shtml

Geriatric Social Workers https://www.rightathome.net/blog/geriatric-social-workers-faqs

The Distinct Role of a Hospice Social Worker https://www.hrrv.org/blog/the-distinct-role-of-a-hospice-social-worker/

Clinical Social Work Practice with Older Adults https://www.naswnyc.org/page/171/Clinical-Social-Work-Practice-with-Older-Adults.htm

Understanding Our Aging Society: Social Work Contributions https://www.socialworkers.org/News/Research-Data/Social-Work-Policy-Research/Understanding-Our-Aging-Society-Social-Work-Contributions

Strength in Numbers: A Millennial’s View on the Value of Working with Older Adults https://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/exc_0616.shtml

Lesson 4 Discussion

Please review the readings and consider the following in your discussion response:

· What are some of the signs of Alzheimer’s Disease that a Social Worker should be aware of?

· What are the differences between Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease?

· What surprised you about this information?

This discussion post should be a minimum of 250 words or one page.

READING RESOURCES

Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/alzheimers

Dementia Facts https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/facts-figures

What is Alzheimer’s Disease https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-alzheimers-disease

Types of Dementia https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-dementia/types-of-dementia

The Truth About Aging and Dementia https://www.cdc.gov/aging/publications/features/dementia-not-normal-aging.html

Dementia vs Alzheimer’s https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/difference-between-dementia-and-alzheimer-s

SWK206-HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL ENVIRO I

Lesson 4 Discussion 1

How and why does the development of language illustrate the importance of culture and provide evidence for the sociological perspective? Minimum length 1 page (250 words). 

Lesson 4 Discussion 2

Some people say the United States is too individualistic and competitive, while other people say these values are part of what makes America great. What do you think? Why? The minimum length is one page (250 words). 

SWK207-HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL ENVIRO II 

Lesson 4 Discussion 1

Share a time when you or someone you knew engaged in self-handicapping. What was the outcome of doing so? The original post should be a minimum of 1 page (250 words).

Lesson 4 Discussion 2

Do you think that you have a more positive or a more negative attributional style? How do you think this style influences your judgments about your own successes and failures? The original post should be a minimum of 1 page (250 words). 

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

Human Behavior and the
Social Environment I

SUSAN TYLER

U N I V E R S I T Y O F A R K A N S A S L I B R A R I E S

F AY E T T E V I L L E , A R

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I by Susan Tyler is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License,
except where otherwise noted.

All content CC BY-NC-SA unless otherwise noted.

Contents

Introduction 1

Attributions 6

Part I. The Person in Environment

Chapter 1: How We Use Our Expectations 25

Part II. The Biopsychosocial Dimension

Chapter 2: Lifespan Theories 79

Part III. The Sociocultural Dimension

Chapter 3: Theoretical Perspectives 105

Chapter 4: The Elements of Culture 120

Part IV. The Social Change Dimension

Chapter 5: Social Categorization & Stereotyping 161

Chapter 6: In-group Favoritism & Prejudice 191

Chapter 7: Reducing Discrimination 210

Chapter 8: Racial & Ethnic Inequality 233

Part V. Pre-Pregnancy & Prenatal Development

Chapter 9: Heredity, Prenatal Development, &

Birth

Heredity 280

Prenatal Development 291

Birth 320

279

Part VI. Development in Infancy & Toddlerhood

Chapter 10: Physical Development in Infancy &

Toddlerhood

347

Chapter 11: Cognitive Development in Infancy &

Toddlerhood

387

Chapter 12: Psychosocial Development in Infancy

& Toddlerhood

Infant Emotions 429

Forming Attachments 433

425

Part VII. Development in Early Childhood

Chapter 13: Physical Development in Early

Childhood

465

Chapter 14: Cognitive Development in Early

Childhood

502

Chapter 15: Psychosocial Development in Early

Childhood

551

Part VIII. Development in Middle Childhood

Chapter 16: Physical Development in Middle

Childhood

603

Chapter 17: Cognitive Development in Middle

Childhood

630

Chapter 18: Psychosocial Development in Middle

Childhood

690

Part IX. Development in Adolescence

Chapter 19: Physical Development in Adolescence 733

Chapter 20: Cognitive Development in

Adolescence

763

Chapter 21: Psychosocial Development in

Adolescence

786

Part X. Development in Early Adulthood

Chapter 22: Physical Development in Early

Adulthood

815

Chapter 23: Cognitive Development in Early

Adulthood

861

Chapter 24: Psychosocial Development in Early

Adulthood

897

Part XI. Development in Middle Adulthood

Chapter 25: Physical Development in Middle

Adulthood

959

Chapter 26: Cognitive Development in Middle

Adulthood

1023

Chapter 27: Psychosocial Development in Middle

Adulthood

1064

Part XII. Development in Late Adulthood

Chapter 28: Physical Development in Late

Adulthood

1135

Chapter 29: Cognitive Development in Late

Adulthood

1197

Chapter 30: Psychosocial Development in Late

Adulthood

1245

Additional Resources 1299

Adopt this book! 1302

Why do people do the things they do?

That’s what we are here to find out – Human Behavior and the
Social Environment (HBSE) – How do they connect? How does it
shape us? Why do we think and feel the way we do?

This will be explored throughout this course by examining human

behavior throughout life stage developments and our interactions

with the social environment. This course will explore theoretical

perspectives in Social Work to help provide a foundation for

organizing thoughts about client needs and issues they are seeking

supports for. Theories will then be connected to important

developmental, social, and cultural issues that present throughout

each stage of life to create an overall picture of a client’s experience

and how we can use this information to have a better understanding

of how people we work with are influenced and why. Knowledge of

typical development in each stage of life will also inform the Social

Worker if any other supports, resources, or services may be needed.

“Social workers are knowledgeable about human

behavior across the life course; the range of social

systems in which people live; and the ways social

systems promote or deter people in maintaining or

achieving health and well-being. Social workers apply

theories and knowledge from the liberal arts to

understand biology, social, cultural, psychological and

spiritual development.” – CSWE (2008, p.6)

There is no single definition for HBSE. I encourage you to think

Introduction | 1

about what it means to you. In Social Work, rarely do we work with

people whose problems are straightforward. Typically we encounter

problems that are complex and interconnected on several levels

and require looking at the relationships between behaviors and

environments. We like to explore as much as possible in Social

Work and use of theories within various dimensions (biological,

psychological, social, and spiritual) allows us to have a broader

knowledge base in several different areas to have a better

understanding and ability to “put it all together” to assess and

intervene with client concerns.

We will utilize vignettes to work in connecting each theory,

approach, perspective, and life stage of development throughout

this course. Each section will begin with a vignette that will be

incorporated throughout to demonstrate examples of each concept

(that is not covered in your readings). Life stage development

vignettes will be used as an “unfolding case” to allow you to work in

critical thinking of how the theories, approaches, and perspectives

connect throughout each life stage.

Social Work Values:

Service – engage in this by helping people address
and hopefully resolve their problems/concerns – also

engage in service through volunteering time to

organizations within the community (boards, mentoring

programs, etc).

Social Justice – advocate and fight against social
injustices for individuals/groups – generally focusing in

areas of poverty, discrimination, education,

unemployment, etc.

2 | Introduction

Integrity – We must always work to be trustworthy,
honest, and responsible in our work and with our

clients.

Competence – always strive to improve our
knowledge and expertise through continuous learning

and education.

Human relationships – connect as partners
throughout the process – also work to improve

relationships within the client’s system to help improve

overall functioning through increased connections/

supports.

Dignity – value and respect each person we meet and
engage with compassion and respect.

Critical Thinking Skills:

What is it?

• Reasoning – interest in the unknown – what’s
going?

• Evaluating – challenging appearances – what do
you think you see vs what you actually see?

• Problem-solving/decision making – explore all
sides and determine the best decision.

Introduction | 3

• Analyzing – how do they connect? What does it
all mean? How does it all add up? Best decision?

Time for reflection.

Why is this important?

1. Theories, approaches, and perspectives help lay the foundation

for any realistic and rational practice in any field. Our

professional values lay the foundation on which social work’s

mission is based. They help guide us in decision making as they

are directed towards a specific purpose and help us to grow

and develop.

2. Justification for your decisions – we must use critical thinking

skills to explore and process how decisions may impact our

clients and we must be able to discuss how our decisions were

determined.

About the Author:

Susan Tyler, MSW, LCSW – Clinical Assistant Professor, University

of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

Professor Tyler has been teaching at the School of Social Work

since Spring 2018. Before joining the School of Social Work, she

worked in a community based mental health agency for over 10

years with a focus in Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health

and School-Based Mental Health services revolving around issues

4 | Introduction

related to trauma, abuse, attachment, anxiety, depression, domestic

violence, foster care, adjustments, disruptive behaviors, and ADHD,

through use of play therapy techniques and dyadic interventions.

“Be the change you wish to see in the world” – Mahatma Gandhi
“You can do it” – Rob Schneider

References:

CSWE Commission on Accreditation. (2008). EPAS Handbook.

Council on Social Work Education.

Introduction | 5

Attributions

The Meaning Behind This Book

I began my career in Social Work working in the mental health field

with a focus in Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health. I realized

during this time just how much a person’s experiences and their

environments impacted all aspects of their lives, including why they

made the choices or responded the way they did. After a little over

a decade of mental health work, I had an opportunity to make a

change in my career and joined the world of academia. During my

first semester teaching, I became aware of the Open Educational

Resources at our university and immediately thought of the benefits

of transitioning this course with providing a free, online accessible

textbook that would support both students and instructors alike

in exploring human behavior, social environment, and life stage

development. I began working with the University library system to

compile different chapters from different open and free textbooks

from other disciplines and then added original content to support

connection to Social Work foundations and practice in the first

four sections, as well as creating vignettes to use throughout each

section. This text will support the reader with a deeper

understanding of Social Work theories, perspectives, and

approaches, life stage development, and connection of how they are

utilized in organizing, assessing, and planning for client support.

It is my hope you will come away from this course seeing others

through a lens of empathy, compassion, and curiosity, stopping to

ask yourself, “what must they have experienced in their life?” to

gain a better understanding before jumping to conclusions or

assumptions of others.

“We are all unique. Don’t judge, understand instead.” ~ Roy T.
Bennett

6 | Attributions

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I is adapted from

various work produced and distributed under the Creative

Commons License. Below, is the list of all adapted chapters used in

the making of this book.

Cover Image: Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay.
Chapter 1: Adapted from Chapter 2.2 from Principles of Social

Psychology by the University of Minnesota under the Creative

Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0

International License, except where otherwise noted.

Chapter 2: Adapted from Chapter 9.2: Lifespan Theories
in OpenStax, Psychology. OpenStax CNX. Oct 2, 2019

http://cnx.org/contents/
[email protected] Download for free
at http://cnx.org/contents/
[email protected]

Chapter 3: Adapted from Theoretical Perspectives by Rice
University under the Creative Commons Attribution-

NonCommercial 4.0 license.

Chapter 4: Adapted from Chapter 3.2 from Sociology by the
University of Minnesota under the Creative Commons Attribution-

NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where

otherwise noted.

Chapter 5: Adapted from Chapter 12.1 from Principles of Social
Psychology by the University of Minnesota under the Creative

Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0

International License, except where otherwise noted.

Chapter 6: Adapted from Chapter 12.2 from Principles of Social
Psychology by the University of Minnesota under the Creative

Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0

International License, except where otherwise noted.

Chapter 7: Adapted from Chapter 12.3 from Principles of Social
Psychology by the University of Minnesota under the Creative

Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0

International License, except where otherwise noted.

Chapter 8: Adapted from Chapter 3.1, 3.2, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, and 3.8

Attributions | 7

from Social Problems by the University of Minnesota under the

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0

International License, except where otherwise noted.

Chapter 9: Adapted from Chapter 2 from Lifespan Development:
A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by Martha Lally and

Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative Commons

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported license.

Chapter 10 – 12: Adapted from Chapter 3 from Lifespan
Development: A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by

Martha Lally and Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative

Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported

license.

Chapter 13 – 15: Adapted from Chapter 4 from Lifespan
Development: A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by

Martha Lally and Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative

Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported

license.

Chapter 16 – 18: Adapted from Chapter 5 from Lifespan
Development: A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by

Martha Lally and Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative

Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported

license.

Chapter 19 – 21: Adapted from Chapter 6 from Lifespan
Development: A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by

Martha Lally and Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative

Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported

license.

Chapter 22 – 24: Adapted from Chapter 7 from Lifespan
Development: A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by

Martha Lally and Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative

Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported

license.

Chapter 25 – 27: Adapted from Chapter 8 from Lifespan
Development: A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by

Martha Lally and Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative

8 | Attributions

Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported

license.

Chapter 28 – 30: Adapted from Chapter 9 from Lifespan
Development: A Psychological Perspective Second Edition by

Martha Lally and Suzanne Valentine-French under the Creative

Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 unported

license.

Attributions | 9

PART I

THE PERSON IN
ENVIRONMENT

Learning Objectives:

• Explore the Person in Environment Approach

• Describe the Micro, Mezzo, and Macro

Approach

• Describe the Bio-Psycho-Social-Spiritual

Approach

• Describe Systems Theory

• Describe Ecological Theory

• Describe Ecosystems Theory

• Introduce Strengths Perspective

The Person in Environment | 11

Photo by Christian Erfurt on Unsplash

Vignette

Jason’s parents have been

called by the school social

worker to discuss concerns

related to fighting with a peer

and declining grades. His

parents also report concerns at

home with poor sibling

relationships, anger issues, and

“a bad attitude, always talking

back, never listening or doing

what we ask him to do”. They report a long family history of substance

abuse and mental health issues (anxiety and depression). They report

increased concerns related to this as they recently found marijuana in

Jason’s room. Jason (14 y/o) reports “My parents don’t know what

they’re talking about. My little brother and sister just get me in trouble

because I don’t let them touch my stuff, besides, my parents don’t care,

they don’t listen to me, they just want me to do what they say. And I

don’t see what the big deal is with me smoking a little weed, it helps

me feel better and not be so mad all the time.”

What comes to mind when you hear
Person-In-Environment?

This approach is the concept that people can be heavily influenced

by their environment. It highlights the importance of understanding

an individual and their behavior through their environment. A

person’s environment, along with their experiences, will help shape

the way they view the world, how they think, and why they respond

the way they do. In Social Work, gathering information from our

clients is a foundation piece of the work we do and knowing what

12 | The Person in Environment

information to seek and how to organize it is like gathering pieces

of a puzzle and working to put them together to get the whole

picture (or at least as much of it as we can). This lesson will begin to

introduce some particular approaches, perspectives, and theories

that help build the lens and foundation of the Social Work

profession.

Micro, Mezzo, and Macro

We will first start with the Micro, Mezzo, and Macro Approach. This
is simply looking at levels within a person’s system, which will help

give you some direction in what supports may be needed.

The Micro-level represents individual needs and involves direct
interactions with clients, which is the most common type of social

work. This level explores aspects related to biology, psychological

needs, social (peer) and interpersonal (family) relationships or

supports, and spiritual beliefs.

Jason’s micro level – Biologically no physical health

issues have been reported but some concerns may be

related to how use of marijuana may affect his physical

health. He is an adolescent which means his body

continues to experience hormonal and physical changes.

Family reports history of substance abuse issues as well as

struggles with mental health issues, which may indicate

possible genetic connections to be explored. This may also

be connected to psychological needs as he may be

experiencing anxiety or depressive symptoms or if he

reports use of marijuana as a coping mechanism. He is

The Person in Environment | 13

also reported to present with anger, fighting with his

siblings and struggling with strained family relationships.

This connects us to social aspects, exploring how he

identifies his relationships and supports. No spiritual

beliefs were reported in the vignette but would need to be

explored when meeting with Jason.

The Mezzo-level represents connections or interactions with small
groups, such as family, schools, churches, neighborhoods,

community organizations, and peers/co-workers.

Jason’s mezzo level – Here we would look further into

how his relationships and interactions with various

groups impact him – family, peers, school staff/faculty,

possible spiritual affiliation/church, and any community

groups or organizations he identifies being connected

with.

The Macro-level represents connections to systemic issues within
large systems, such as laws/legislation, policy, healthcare systems,

and international associations. This level also explores ethical

frameworks, historical impacts of group experiences, and how

discrimination and prejudice can impact marginalized populations.

Jason’s macro level – Education/school policies, mental

health policies, healthcare systems, culture and historical

14 | The Person in Environment

impacts of group experiences, d

Place your order now for a similar assignment and have exceptional work written by one of our experts, guaranteeing you an A result.

Need an Essay Written?

This sample is available to anyone. If you want a unique paper order it from one of our professional writers.

Get help with your academic paper right away

Quality & Timely Delivery

Free Editing & Plagiarism Check

Security, Privacy & Confidentiality