M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson intial post and 3 peers responses history board M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson Previous Next Overview The WOW disc

M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson intial post and 3 peers responses history board M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson

Previous

Next

Overview

The WOW disc

Click here to Order a Custom answer to this Question from our writers. It’s fast and plagiarism-free.

M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson intial post and 3 peers responses history board M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson

Previous

Next

Overview

The WOW discussion is an opportunity to share with the class something that surprised you in your reading, research, or study of the topics we cover in this module. As you read and watch the stories that make up our history, look for things that make you say to yourself “I didn’t know that” or “WOW! That’s cool!”. You will convert this fun fact or pertinent point into a mini-lesson on the topic and share it with your peers in this discussion.
This assignment is designed to help you develop an internal dialogue while reading and studying history. An internal dialogue while reading makes us more effective readers and efficient learners as it improves understanding and memory of story told in the text.

Instructions

WOW! Lesson

1. While reading the e-text, and explorations, as well as watching the video clips in this module, write down several WOW “I didn’t know that” or “That’s amazing!” facts.
2. Select one WOW! fact that you noted and write at least 3 critical thinking** questions about this topic. **Critical thinking questions are questions that require you to analyze information and form a judgment. Questions such as When was X born? are not critical thinking questions.
3. Research and find the answers to your WOW! fact questions. If you can’t find a definitive answer to a question, look for interesting related topics and list them as your answer.
4. Use your questions and answers to build a WOW! lesson for your classmates (as described below). This may be the only thing your classmates learn about your WOW! fact and you are the teacher, so please be thorough!

Formatting

1. At the top of your discussion post, state the WOW! fact (as a quote or paraphrase) followed by an in-text citation of your fact’s source. Use in-text citation (not bibliographic citation) in APA, MLA or Chicago Style format.
2. Write a paragraph (3 – 5 sentences in addition to your quote or paraphrased information) about why that information excited you or why you found it interesting.
3. Below the paragraph, list each WOW! fact question followed immediately by your researched answer of at least a paragraph in length (3 sentences minimum). Each answer should also include an in-text citation or note in APA, MLA or Chicago Style format. (Note: this is a total of at least 4 in-text citations in your post and quotations should be used minimally in your answers or not at all).
4. Include a bibliographic list (References, Works Cited, or Bibliography as appropriate) for all the sources you used for research. Remember these should be appropriate research resources – no tertiary sources.

Posting

1. Post your WOW! lesson to the discussion to share with classmates. (While your instructor reads posts and shares comments as necessary, this discussion is intended to be a student-led conversation.)
2. Respond to at least two classmates’ WOW assignments with two additional questions each that keep the discussion moving forward. Your responses should be both reflective and respectful as you pose your questions.
3. Reply to any questions asked of your WOW! thread.

E-text reading:

http://media.ccconline.org/ccco/2020Master/HIS111/eText/Sections/Section6/Page17.html

3 Peers:

Peer 1: Lilliana Garza

one thing that gave me a wow was the heian period. This period i read in the module 6 etext. I thought was very interesting because i do not know much about buddist people or their culture. to be honest i do not know anything about them other than their name. “During the Heian period, a warrior class rose to power finally ending the control of the Fujiwaras. In 1156, a civil war broke out between the Taira clan and the Minamoto clan. Both clans relied on warriors called samurai. The samurais were similar in practice to European feudalism at roughly the same time. The samurai fought for his lord and gave him loyalty. In return, the lord gave the samurai land or payment. For a period of 20 years, a member of the Taira clan dominated the court by marrying his daughter to the emperor and becoming prime minister. The Taira clan members took control of the provinces, managed estates throughout Japan and built a fortune through trade. The Taira clan rule ended in 1180 when the Minamoto clan defeated them and their leader, Yoritomo, became shogun.” This was a big thing because they defeated their leader and was able to be free. During this period people were rising with the warrior class and the warrior class worked really hard to defeate the leader.

Peer 2: Rosa Moran

Many years ago, I heard about how Asian women, especially Chinese and Japanese, used small shoes to stop their feet to keep growing. Well, what my ignorant mind was about to discover was a disturbing image of a deformed woman’s feet that was not even able to walk properly. My heart stopped and tears came down my cheeks. I was astonished while watching the video of a living history woman. How in the world does a woman think this is beauty? This cultural practice is called foot binding and started to be practiced by Chinese women and later in Japan when Confucianism was adopted.

What is the process of foot binding?

Food binding started typically from the age of five to eight years old. After prayers to Buddhist “Tiny-Footed Maiden Goddess” (Cartwright). The process was performed by a “professional foot binder” or family older woman who proceeded by breaking girls’ toes and foot arches, wrapping the foot with cloth (bandages) with the toes bending to the sole of the foot. After a painful month, girls’ feet would be reviewed and bandages re-adjusted. Every month the bandages would loosen and re-adjust until teenage years or even longer; the desired result was small feet of about 3 to 4 inches (Cartwright).

When did women start practicing foot binding?

Footbinding practice started in the 10th Century to 1949 in China. The Tang dynasty court dancers were known for their small feet. Dr. Amanda Foreman in her video The Ascent of Woman explores how “Confucian ideals defining feminine virtue” the foot binding was one of these ideas of feminine virtue and sign of higher social class. It is disappointing to see Japanese women as one of the few females having a starring role as rules, queens, and goddesses; as they were “the creator of Japanese culture” being confined to home (Foreman).

What were the social, religious, or cultural reasons for food binding?

In society, it was ideal for women to have small foot sizes and was perceived as a sign of sophistication. We are talking of an ancient world dominated by men and where women were at the bottom of the social class. Katie Hunt in her CNN article argues that this was the story male figures at home would imprint on the young minds of 6 or 7-year-old girls. Girls would think that having a small foot size increases the chances of getting into a good marriage, but the intention behind was that girls were in excruciating pain that cannot walk so they would spend hours working with their hands contributing to the household economy (Hunt).

Works Cited

Cartwright, Mark. “Foot-Binding.” World History Encyclopedia, World History Encyclopedia, 5 Dec. 2021, https://www.worldhistory.org/Foot-Binding/.

Foreman, Dr. Amanda. “The Ascent of Woman, Separation, Women as the Creators of Japanese Culture.” BBC Two, BBC, https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0319xw4.

Hunt, Katie. “Work, Not Sex? the Real Reason Chinese Women Bound Their Feet.” CNN, Cable News Network, 22 May 2017,

https://www.cnn.com/2017/05/21/health/china-foot-binding-new-theory/index.html

.

Peer 3: Samantha Davis

The most interesting factoid I discovered during our Module 6 research, was that the Yayoi civilization of Japan was ruled by several female shamaness, including one infamous and unmarried one named Queen Himiko. Very few ancient civilizations, and modern ones to be honest, have the open mindedness to let a female rule over them. “According to the Chinese, Himiko controlled a large part of Kyushu between the years 183 and 248 (Smitha).” She is said to be a direct descendant of the sun goddess, Amaterasu, who was one of the most important deities in the Shinto religion of ancient Japan. So she has had an immensely influential impact on the life of the Yayoi culture.
1. What is Queen Himiko best known for?
Queen Himiko, is the first recorded empress of what became known as Japan. Her most important move during her rule was to build the Grand Shrine of Ise. According to records, Himiko was a daughter of the emperor Sunin. Upon his death she was given the sacred mirror of the sun goddess, Amaterasu (Mulhern). This artifact was supposedly enshrined at the shrine she built.
0. Who were the other female rulers of the Yayoi people?
Legends and myths are written into the Kojiki but so are truths and history, so it makes this source difficult to decipher between the two. Legend says that Jingu was one of the most controversial leaders of early Japan. After her husband’s murder, she seeked out revenge on those her were directly involved, and then using that momentum she invaded the Korean Peninsula (Chamberlain).
0. How is Himiko linked to Amaterasu?
Some theories say that Himiko is the granddaughter of the sun goddess Amaterasu, but others say that Himiko is the sun goddess herself. In the Sun and the Throne the author says that neither of these theories are true, that the name Himiko itself just means “princess endowed with a spiritual power” (Kirkland).
References
Chamberlain, Basil H. The Kojiki: Records of Ancient Matters. Rutland, Vt: C.E. Tuttle Co, 1982.
Kirkland, Russell. “The Sun and the Throne. The Origins of the Royal Descent Myth in Ancient Japan.” Numen, vol. 44, no. 2, Brill, 1997, pp. 109–52.
Mulhern, Chieko J. Heroic with Grace: Legendary Women of Japan. Sharpe, 1991.
Smitha, Frank E. “The Yayoi-Japanese.” The Ancient Japanese, 2018,
www.fsmitha.com/h1/ch28ja.htm.

less

M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson

Previous

Next

Overview

The WOW discussion is an opportunity to share with the class

something that surprised you in your reading, research, or stu

dy of the

topics we cover in this module. As you read and watch the stories that

make up our history, look for things that make you say to yourself “I

didn’t know that” or “WOW! That’s cool!”. You will convert this fun fact

or pertinent point into a mini

l

esson on the topic and share it with your

peers in this discussion.

This assignment is designed to help you develop an internal dialogue

while reading and studying history. An internal dialogue while reading

makes us more effective readers and efficient le

arners as it improves

understanding and memory of story told in the text.

Instructions

WOW! Lesson

1.

While reading the e

text, and explorations, as well as watching the

video clips in this module, write down several WOW “I didn’t

know that” or “That’s amazin

g!” facts.

2.

Select one WOW! fact that you noted and write at least 3 critical

thinking** questions about this topic. **Critical thinking questions

are questions that require you to analyze information and form a

judgment. Questions such as When was X born?

are not critical

thinking questions.

3.

Research and find the answers to your WOW! fact questions. If

you can’t find a definitive answer to a question, look for

interesting related topics and list them as your answer.

4.

Use your questions and answers to build a

WOW! lesson for your

classmates (as described below). This may be the only thing your

M6 Discussion 2: WOW! Lesson

Previous

Next

Overview
The WOW discussion is an opportunity to share with the class
something that surprised you in your reading, research, or study of the
topics we cover in this module. As you read and watch the stories that
make up our history, look for things that make you say to yourself “I
didn’t know that” or “WOW! That’s cool!”. You will convert this fun fact
or pertinent point into a mini-lesson on the topic and share it with your
peers in this discussion.
This assignment is designed to help you develop an internal dialogue
while reading and studying history. An internal dialogue while reading
makes us more effective readers and efficient learners as it improves
understanding and memory of story told in the text.
Instructions
WOW! Lesson
1. While reading the e-text, and explorations, as well as watching the
video clips in this module, write down several WOW “I didn’t
know that” or “That’s amazing!” facts.
2. Select one WOW! fact that you noted and write at least 3 critical
thinking** questions about this topic. **Critical thinking questions
are questions that require you to analyze information and form a
judgment. Questions such as When was X born? are not critical
thinking questions.
3. Research and find the answers to your WOW! fact questions. If
you can’t find a definitive answer to a question, look for
interesting related topics and list them as your answer.
4. Use your questions and answers to build a WOW! lesson for your
classmates (as described below). This may be the only thing your

Place your order now for a similar assignment and have exceptional work written by one of our experts, guaranteeing you an A result.

Need an Essay Written?

This sample is available to anyone. If you want a unique paper order it from one of our professional writers.

Get help with your academic paper right away

Quality & Timely Delivery

Free Editing & Plagiarism Check

Security, Privacy & Confidentiality