Oversleeping Jake Post a cohesive response regarding the story “Oversleeping” see attachment. The author blends reality and fantasy. * Analyze how this

Oversleeping Jake Post a cohesive response regarding the story “Oversleeping” see attachment.

The author blends reality and fantasy.

* Analyze how this

Click here to Order a Custom answer to this Question from our writers. It’s fast and plagiarism-free.

Post a cohesive response regarding the story “Oversleeping” see attachment. 

The author blends reality and fantasy. 

* Analyze how this helps the reader identify with the main character.

* Write a well-organized, structured response using specific evidence from the story to support your answer. 

* Provide introduction, body and conclusion

* No plagiarism

* 24 hours 

NEBRASKA STATE
ACCOUNTABILITY

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
ITEM AND SCORING SAMPLER

GRADE 8

Nebraska State Accountability assessments are administered by the Nebraska Department of Education (NDE).
301 Centennial Mall South – P.O. Box 94987 – Lincoln, Nebraska 68509 – (402) 471-2495

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 ii

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Table of Contents

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ITEM AND SCORING SAMPLER

General Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Sampler Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Purpose and Uses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Item Format and Scoring Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Depth of Knowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Item and Scoring Sampler Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

PASSAGES AND ITEMS

Passage 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Multiple-Choice Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Evidence-Based Selected Response Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Auto-Scored Constructed Response Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Text Dependent Analysis Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Text Dependent Analysis Rubric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Example Student Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Passage 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Multiple-Choice Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Evidence-Based Selected Response Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Auto-Scored Constructed Response Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Text Dependent Analysis Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Text Dependent Analysis Rubric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Example Student Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Independent Writing Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 1

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Information About the Item and Scoring Sampler

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

The Nebraska Department of Education provides districts and schools with tools to assist in delivering
focused instructional programs aligned to the state assessment system . These tools include Table of
Specifications documents, administration manuals, and content-based item and scoring samplers . This
Item and Scoring Sampler is a useful tool for Nebraska educators in the preparation of local instructional
programs and the statewide NeSA-ELA .

SAMPLER CONTENTS

This sampler contains reading passages with test questions (items) that have been written to align to the
assessment indicators that are based on the Nebraska College- and Career-Ready English Language Arts
Standards . The passages represent some of the genres approved by NDE to appear on an operational
Nebraska College- and Career-Ready NeSA-ELA . The test questions provide a simulation of the types of
items that will appear on an operational Nebraska College- and Career-Ready NeSA-ELA . Each sample test
question has been through a rigorous review process to ensure alignment with the assessment indicators .

PURPOSE AND USES

The purpose of the sampler is to expose teachers and administrators to new item types and to show how
these items align to the revised Nebraska College- and Career-Ready English Language Arts Standards . Many
of the items provided in the sampler will be accessible to students in the form of ELA Practice Tests, Guided
Practice Tests, and Online Tools Training resources .

ITEM FORMAT AND SCORING GUIDELINES

The Nebraska College- and Career-Ready NeSA-ELA has four types of test questions . For grade 8, the
types of test questions are Multiple-Choice (MC), Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR), Auto-Scored
Constructed Response (ASCR), and Text Dependent Analysis (TDA) .

Multiple Choice (MC):

All MC items have four answer choices, including three distractors and one correct answer . Distractors
represent common misconceptions, incorrect logic, common misinterpretations, unsound reasoning, casual
reading, etc . A correct response to an MC item is worth one point .

Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR):

EBSR items have two parts and are designed to elicit an evidence-based response based on what a student
has read from either an Informational Text or Literature stimulus passage . Each EBSR item is linked to a
passage or passage set . Part A of an EBSR item is similar to a typical MC test question . A student analyzes a
passage and chooses a single, best (correct) answer from four answer choices . Part B of an EBSR item elicits
evidence from the stimulus passage and requires that the student select one or two answers based on the
response the student provided in Part A . Part B is also different from Part A in that it may have more than
four answer options, which is typical of an MC item . Each EBSR (Part A and Part B combined) is worth two
points .

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 2

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Information About the Item and Scoring Sampler

Auto-Scored Constructed Response (ASCR):

ASCR item types provide a new forum in which to address higher-level thinking skills without the use of
hand-scored test questions . Using the expansive features and functions of online testing, developers will
incorporate technical enhancements to the test question, the response area, and/or the stimulus . Item
types may include drag-and-drop, hot-spot, and in-line selection of multiple answers from drop-down
menus . Students will be able to manipulate information within dynamic tasks such as dragging and pasting
elements, highlighting text, and selecting multiple answers from a variety of presentation methods . Each
ASCR test question is worth one or two points .

Text Dependent Analysis (TDA):

Similar to an EBSR item, the TDA Writing Prompt is designed to elicit an evidence-based response from a
student who has read either an Informational Text or Literature passage during the test event . The TDA is an
on-demand, text-based writing piece that requires students to provide evidence from the text to support
analysis, reflection, or ideas and opinions . Students must draw on basic writing skills while inferring and
synthesizing information from the passage (making use of and referencing content from the passage to
support the analysis) in order to develop a comprehensive response . Students will be given a TDA Writer’s
Checklist to assist in composing their response . The TDA will be scored using a holistic scoring rubric
designed to provide a measurement of writing, conventions, and reading . The TDA is in alignment across
grades 3–8 and 11 with the NeSA-ELA Standards indicated on the rubric . Each TDA Writing Prompt test
question is scored using a rubric and will be reported to reading and writing .

DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE

In addition to being aligned to the standards, the sample items included in this sampler were also developed
with a particular emphasis on cognitive complexity, or Depth of Knowledge (DOK) . The DOK level is also
provided for each item in this sampler in the Item Information Table . DOK measures the level of cognitive
demand required to complete an assessment item . The following descriptions show the expectations of the
DOK levels in greater detail .

Level 1 (Recall of Information) generally requires students to identify, list, or define, often asking them
to recall who, what, when, and where . Consequently, this level usually asks students to recall facts, terms,
concepts, and trends and may ask them to identify specific information contained in documents, excerpts,
quotations, maps, charts, tables, graphs, or illustrations . Items that require students to “describe” and/or
“explain” could be classified at Level 1 or Level 2, depending on what is to be described and/or explained . A
Level 1 “describe” and/or “explain” would require students to recall, recite, or reproduce information .

Level 2 (Basic Reasoning) includes the engagement of some mental processing beyond recalling or
reproducing a response . A Level 2 “describe” and/or “explain” would require students to go beyond a
description or explanation of recalled information to describe and/or explain a result or “how” or “why .”

Level 3 (Complex Reasoning) requires reasoning, using evidence, and thinking on a higher and more
abstract level than Level 1 and Level 2 . Students will go beyond explaining or describing “how and why”
to justifying the “how and why” through application and evidence . Level 3 questions often involve making
connections across time and place to explain a concept or “big idea .”

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 3

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Information About the Item and Scoring Sampler

ITEM AND SCORING SAMPLER FORMAT

Sample questions are provided in this sampler, along with any related stimulus information such as a
passage or graphic . Following each test question is an item information table .

Example Response Item Information Table

Item Information

Alignment Assigned
Indicator

Assigned indicator definition

Answer Key Correct Answer Option Annotations

Brief answer option analysis or rationaleDepth of Knowledge Assigned DOK

Focus Skill/Task

All Text Dependent Analysis items in this sampler are supported by an item information table, the TDA
Scoring Rubric, and annotated sample student responses at each score point .

The NeSA-ELA is administered primarily online . Although there is a paper-pencil format, the examples in this
sampler include samples of students’ responses in online format .

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For more information related to the Nebraska plan and schedule for making the transition to NeSA-English
Language Arts, see http://www .education .ne .gov/Assessment and select the link on the left titled “ELA
Transition .”

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 4

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

PASSAGE 1

Oversleeping

So Jake spread his arms, leaped skyward from the sidewalk, and began to fly, rocketing up
over the neighborhood. Suddenly he heard the distant voice of his father calling, as if from
another universe, and Jake pried open sleep-heavy eyes.

“Get up, pal,” said Jake’s father, “or you’ll miss the school bus.”

“Just let me sleep a little longer,” Jake mumbled. Then he groaned and turned over, pulling
the covers up over his head like a tent, as if to somehow recapture his dream. Jake loved to
sleep. It wasn’t that he was lazy or lacked energy. Jake was a normal fourteen-year-old kid in
every way. But he loved to curl up under a soft white cloud of sheets, rest his head on a
marshmallow pillow, and luxuriate in the twilight world of slumber where life is exciting and
dreams always come true.

So Jake was sitting at a table at a fancy café in Hollywood, having lunch with a famous
movie director, who was offering Jake a role in his next big action flick when . . .

“Get up,” said Jake’s father, gently shaking his son’s shoulders. Jake yawned and hauled his
legs over the side of the mattress, where he sat for a few moments to reconcile himself with the
shocking reality of upright existence. He dragged himself into the shower, where he briefly
dreamed of tropical rain forests, and at last shuffled downstairs to breakfast.

“Jake’s going to sleep his life away!” stated Taylor, his nine-year-old sister, as she sat at the
table, kicking her dangling legs excitedly as if to show by comparison how wide awake she was.

“He’s just a growing boy,” said Jake’s father, washing dishes at the kitchen sink. “Right?”
Jake nodded sleepily and finished his breakfast. He trudged out the front door with Taylor, still
half-sleepwalking, and they waited on the curb for their school bus, as usual.

At school, finally fully awake, Jake cycled through the pleasant routine of another typical day.
He greeted his buddy Benjamin at the locker they shared. They discussed hockey games and
books. Then there was science with Mr. Albert, math with Ms. Freed, and lunch with Benjamin,
who always told great jokes. After school, there was homework, dinner with his dad and Taylor,
maybe a little TV, and then off to dreamland. And so went week after week, and month after
month.

So Jake swung the bat, sending the ball out of the stadium and into the Baseball Hall of
Fame . . .

“Come on, get up,” commanded Taylor, holding a ringing alarm clock only inches from her
brother’s face. “You’ll be late for school!” Jake shook his head in disbelief and ducked under the
covers.

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 55

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

11 Moments later Jake awakened to an empty, quiet room. Then he got up and padded sleepily
down the hallway. The bathroom mirror reflected a face that was oddly unfamiliar—one with
heavier eyebrows and new creases in its brow. Jake rubbed a hand over his face and felt the
unexpected sandpaper abrasion of whiskers. Mystified and dazed, he staggered downstairs to
the kitchen, where he was perplexed to discover a teenaged Taylor sitting at the breakfast table
beside his father, who seemed older somehow.

“So you finally woke up,” commented Jake’s father, casually sipping his coffee. “We thought
you’d sleep forever.”

“You certainly overslept!” added Taylor in a surprisingly mature voice.

Jake shook his head as if to disperse the fog of dreams. “What are you talking about?”

“You’ve been asleep for four years,” Jake’s father replied calmly. “Better get dressed, or
you’ll be late for your last day of school.” This statement set Jake’s mind reeling. His last day of
school? Had he really slept so long? Was he now eighteen years old?

Lost in a whirl of confusion, Jake went to his room to dress for school and discovered that
none of his clothes fit him. He borrowed a shirt, pants, and shoes from his father—and they made
him look and feel even older.

17 Taylor led Jake out the front door to the curb. Boarding his bus, Jake stared in bewilderment.
He was enthralled by the aged faces of his friends. “Hey, it’s Jake!” shouted someone from the
back of the bus. “He’s back!” One by one, his schoolmates began to recognize him.

“Buddy, you sure look older!” said someone sitting near where Jake stood. Jake looked
down to discover his friend Benjamin smiling heartily and looking startlingly like his older brother.
Jake sat beside Benjamin, who eagerly told what had happened during Jake’s years of slumber—
how Mr. Albert had retired from teaching science, and how Ms. Freed had been named Teacher
of the Year. Benjamin spoke excitedly of hockey games won and lost; of books read and
remembered; of school plays, classes, pep rallies, and car washes. They were small, ordinary
events, but to Jake they seemed extraordinary because they had happened without him. He had
missed grades nine through twelve. His stomach sank when he realized there would be no more
school days with Benjamin, his teachers, or his other friends. Jake had slept them all away . . .

“Come on, buddy, get up,” called Jake’s father. Jake pried open leaden eyelids to see his
father standing in the doorway, with his familiar easy-going grin. Beside him was nine-year-old
Taylor, seemingly more girlish and bubbly than ever before.

“Come on, sleepyhead!” she giggled. Her laughter seemed as bright as the yellow sunshine
splashing about the room. “You don’t want to miss school, do you?”

Jake beamed and looked at his family. “No, I wouldn’t want to do that,” he said as he
jumped up to greet the day.

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 6

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

MULTIPLE-CHOICE ITEMS

1. Which word is a synonym for mystified?

A. dazed

B. staggered

C. perplexed

D. seemed

Item Information

Alignment 8.1.5.d Analyze and use semantic relationships (e.g., multiple
meanings, synonyms, antonyms, figurative language,
connotations, subtle distinctions) to determine the meaning of
words, aid in comprehension, and improve writing.

Answer Key C Option Annotations

The student is asked to identify a synonym for the word
“mystified” as it is used in paragraph 11. Option C is the
correct answer since “perplexed” is a synonym for “mystified.”
Options A, B, and D are not synonyms for the given word.

Depth of Knowledge 2

Focus Synonym

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 77

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

2. In paragraph 17, what is the meaning of enthralled?

A. fascinated

B. offended

C. frightened

D. amused

Item Information

Alignment 8.1.5.b Select and apply knowledge of context clues (e.g., word,
phrase, sentence, and paragraph clues) and text features to
determine meaning of unknown words.

Answer Key A Option Annotations

The student is asked to identify the meaning of the word
“enthralled” as it is used in paragraph 17. Option A is
the correct answer since “fascinated” is a definition for
“enthralled.” Options B, C, and D are not correct meanings for
the given word.

Depth of Knowledge 2

Focus Context Clues

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 8

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

3. Which detail from the story supports the idea that a great deal of time has passed while Jake
was sleeping?

A. He needs to borrow clothing from his father.

B. He awakens to a room that is quiet and empty.

C. He has to ride the school bus with all of his friends.

D. He still feels sleepy as he staggers down to the kitchen.

Item Information

Alignment 8.1.6.i Construct and/or answer literal, inferential, critical, and
interpretive questions and support answers with explicit
evidence from the text or additional sources.

Answer Key A Option Annotations

The student is asked to identify evidence that supports a
given conclusion. Option A is the correct answer since Jake’s
need to borrow larger clothing from his father supports the
conclusion that a great deal of time has passed while he was
sleeping. Options B, C, and D are accurate details from the
passage, but they are unrelated to the given conclusion.

Depth of Knowledge 2

Focus Answer
Interpretive
Questions

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 99

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

4. Which characteristic helps the reader identify the genre of the story?

A. The futuristic setting helps the reader identify the story as science fiction.

B. The abilities of the main character help the reader identify the story as fantasy.

C. The lesson that is taught helps the reader identify the story as a folktale.

D. The main problem helps the reader identify the story as realistic fiction.

Item Information

Alignment 8.1.6.g Cite specific textual evidence to analyze and make inferences
based on the characteristics of a variety of literary and
informational texts.

Answer Key D Option Annotations

The student is asked to determine the genre of the story and
the characteristic that identifies it as such. Option D is the
correct answer since the problem in the story turning out to
be a dream identifies the story as realistic fiction. Option A is
incorrect since the story does not have a “futuristic setting.”
Options B and C are incorrect since the story is neither fantasy
nor a folktale.

Depth of Knowledge 2

Focus Genre

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 10

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

5. Which theme is most strongly conveyed through the story?

A. independence versus dependence

B. age versus experience

C. opportunity versus disappointment

D. individual versus society

Item Information

Alignment 8.1.6.b Analyze and explain the relationships between elements of
literary text (e.g., character development, setting, plot, conflict,
point of view, inferred and recurring themes).

Answer Key C Option Annotations

The student is asked to identify the theme conveyed through
the story. Option C is the correct answer since the main
character is torn between enjoying the opportunity to sleep
late and disappointment in finding out what he might miss by
oversleeping. Options A, B, and D are incorrect since they are
unrelated to the theme of the conflict in the story.

Depth of Knowledge 3

Focus Inferred Theme

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 1111

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

EVIDENCE-BASED SELECTED RESPONSE ITEM

6.

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 12

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

Answer Key – Completed Correct Response

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 1313

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

Item Information

Alignment 8.1.6.c Analyze the author’s use of literary devices (e.g., simile,
metaphor, personification, idiom, oxymoron, hyperbole,
alliteration, onomatopoeia, analogy, tone, mood).

Answer Key Part A: D
Part B: Jake
rubbed a hand
over his face
and felt the
unexpected
sandpaper
abrasion of
whiskers.

Option Annotations

The student is asked to determine how the author uses a
metaphor in paragraph 11 and then to identify a sentence from
the paragraph that supports this determination.

Part A: Option D is the correct answer since “felt the
unexpected sandpaper abrasion of whiskers” is a metaphor
describing “the roughness of Jake’s face.” Options A and B
are incorrect since these descriptions align with the purposes
of hyperbole and personification. Option C is incorrect
because, while plausible for a metaphor, “to express shock” is
not the purpose of this specific metaphor.

Part B: Sentence 4 is the correct answer since “felt the
unexpected sandpaper abrasion of whiskers” is the metaphor
the author uses. The other sentences are incorrect because
they do not use metaphor.

The item is worth 2 points. To receive full credit, the student
must correctly identify the answers to part A and part B. To
receive 1 point, the student must at least select the correct
answer for part A. No credit will be given for a correct
response to part B if part A is incorrect.

Depth of Knowledge 2

Focus Figurative
Language,
Metaphor

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 14

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

AUTO-SCORED CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE ITEM

7.

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 1515

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

Answer Key – Completed Correct Response

Item Information

Alignment 8.1.6.g Cite specific textual evidence to analyze and make inferences
based on the characteristics of a variety of literary and
informational texts.

Answer Key Sentence 5,
Sentence 7

Option Annotations

The student is asked to select two sentences that support
a given inference. The third-from-last sentence and the last
sentence are the correct answers since they both indicate
Jack’s disappointment over the things he has missed by
oversleeping. The other sentences are incorrect since they
reveal details concerning the things he has missed during that
time, but not his feelings of regret.

This item is worth 2 points. To receive full credit, the student
must correctly identify both sentences that support the
inference. To receive 1 point, the student must correctly
identify one of the sentences that support the inference.

Depth of Knowledge 2

Focus Character
Emotions/
Evidence
to Support
Inference

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 16

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

TEXT DEPENDENT ANALYSIS ITEM

8. In the story “Oversleeping,” the author blends reality and fantasy. Analyze how this helps the
reader identify with the main character. Write a well-organized, structured response using
specific evidence from the story to support your answer.

XXX/6000

Item Information

Alignment Reading: 8.1.6.b

Writing: See Rubric

Analyze and explain the relationship between elements
of literary text (e.g., character development, setting, plot,
conflict, point of view, inferred and reoccurring themes).

Answer Key See Rubric Option Annotations

Refer to the sample student responses.Depth of Knowledge 3

q

p

NeSA-English Language Arts Item and Scoring Sampler – Grade 8 1717

NeSA
ELA Sampler

Passages and Items

TEXT DEPENDENT ANALYSIS RUBRIC

D
R
A
FT
 N
eb

ra
sk

D
ep

ar
tm

en

of
 E
du

ca
ti
on

 T
ex
t‐
D
ep

en
de

nt
 A
na

ly
si

(T
D
A
) S

co
ri
ng

 R
ub

ri

N
eb

ra
sk

 

En
gl
is

La
ng
ua

ge
 

A
rt

St
an

da
rd


D
em

on
st
ra
te

lim

it
ed

 a
na

ly
si

of
 t
ex
t,
 

us

of
 e
vi
de

nc
e,
 a
nd

 w
ri
ti
ng

 s
ki
lls
 

2
D
em

on
st
ra
te

pa

rt
ia
lly
 e
ff
ec
ti
ve

Place your order now for a similar assignment and have exceptional work written by one of our experts, guaranteeing you an A result.

Need an Essay Written?

This sample is available to anyone. If you want a unique paper order it from one of our professional writers.

Get help with your academic paper right away

Quality & Timely Delivery

Free Editing & Plagiarism Check

Security, Privacy & Confidentiality